ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS by Bridget White

ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS by Bridget White
ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS by Bridget White

Cooking Training Workshop in Anglo-Indian Cuisine

Cooking Training Workshop in Anglo-Indian Cuisine

No Copy and Paste from this Site

All the recipes and Photographs on this Site are old Family Recipes and tried and tested by the Author. Please feel free to try out these old recipes, and relish them, but desist from copying and using on other sites without the prior permission of Bridget White-Kumar. Any infringement would amount to Plagarism and infringement of Copy Rightpunishable by Law

Cooking Training Workshops in Colonial Anglo-Indian Dishes

Cooking Training Workshops in Colonial Anglo-Indian Dishes

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

ANGLO-INDIAN VEGETARIAN DISHES - DOL AND GREENS CURRY (DHAL AND SPINACH CURRY ), PEPPER WATER AND BEANS FOOGATH













ANGLO-INDIAN VEGETARIAN DISHES  - DOL AND GREENS CURRY  (DHAL AND SPINACH CURRY ), PEPPER WATER AND BEANS FOOGATH
                  1. DOL AND GREENS CURRY  (DHAL AND SPINACH CURRY )
 Serves 6            Time Required: 45 minutes
Ingredients
1 cup Tur Dhal ,
1 cup of spinach chopped finely,  
2 green chilies slit lengthwise,
1  teaspoon chillie powder,
1 teaspoon coriander powder,                     
½ teaspoon turmeric powder,
2 tomatoes chopped,
1 onion chopped,
1 teaspoon crushed garlic,
Salt to taste

For the Tempering: 1 teaspoon mustard, 2 red chilies broken into bits, a few curry leaves and 1 tablespoon oil.
 Wash the dhal and cook it along with the greens, tomato, chillie powder, coriander powder, turmeric powder and onion with sufficient water in a pressure cooker. 
 When done open the cooker, add salt and  a little more water and mash well. 
In another vessel, heat oil and add the mustard, broken red chilies and curry leaves and fry for some time. When the mustard starts spluttering, pour in the cooked dhal. Serve with rice.

                                2. BEANS FOOGATH
Serves 6   Time Required: 35 minutes
Ingredients:
300 grams chopped string beans,
1 onion chopped finely,
1teaspoon mustard seeds,
2 green chillies chopped finely,
1 teaspoon chopped ginger,
2 tablespoon cooking oil,
2 tablespoons grated coconut,
4 or 5 curry leaves,
Salt to taste
 Heat oil in a suitable pan and add the mustard seeds. When they begin to splutter add the curry leaves, chopped onion, chopped green chillies and ginger. Fry lightly for a few minutes. Add the chopped beans and salt and mix well. Add ½ cup of water and cook covered on low heat till the beans are tender but firm and the water evaporates. Mix in the grated coconut. Serve as a side dish.
                                          3. PEPPER WATER
Serves 6   Time Required: 20 minutes
Ingredients
2 large tomatoes chopped
1 teaspoon pepper powder  
1 teaspoon chillie powder
1 teaspoon cumin powder
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
½ teaspoon coriander powder
Salt to taste
½ cup tamarind juice extracted from a small ball of tamarind or 2 teaspoons tamarind paste   
 Cook all the above with 3 or 4 cups of water in a vessel on high heat till it boils. Reduce the heat and cook on low heat for about 5 or 6 minutes. Season as follows with the under mentioned ingredients which should be used whenever a dish is to be seasoned/ tempered.
                        FOR THE TEMPERING:
I small onion sliced
2 red chilies broken into bits
1 teaspoon chopped garlic crushed roughly
½ teaspoon mustard seeds
A few curry leaves
2 teaspoons oil
 Heat the oil in a sutiable vessel and add the mustard seeds. When they begin to splutter, add the curry leaves, onion, crushed garlic and red chilies and sauté for a few minutes.  Pour the cooked pepper water into this and simmer for 2 minutes.  Turn off the heat.  Serve hot with rice and any meat side dish.
 Note: The pepper water can be prepared by using fresh red chilies, cumin seeds, coriander seeds and peppercorns ground in a mixer or blender instead of the powders.


Monday, February 1, 2016

CHICKEN LIVER AND GIZZARDS PEPPER FRY - AN OLD COLONIAL ANGLO-INDIAN DISH






















CHICKEN LIVER AND GIZZARDS PEPPER FRY
A simple and tasty dish that is quite versatile. It could be served as a starter or snack or as a side dish with rice and curry. It tastes amazing with Bread and Fried Potatoes
Serves 6    Time required: 45 minutes
Ingredients
½ kg chicken livers and gizzards cut into pieces
2 large onions sliced finely
2 or 3 teaspoons ground black pepper / pepper powder
 2 green chillies slit
Salt to taste
3 tablespoons oil

Rinse the chicken gizzards and livers well. Boil them with a little water and salt till well cooked.

Heat oil in a pan and fry the onions till golden brown.  Add the cooked gizzards and liver together with the slit green chillies, pepper powder and salt and keep frying on low heat till dry and brown.  Serve as a snack or side dish with bread or rice and fried potatoes 

Thursday, December 24, 2015

COLONIAL ANGLO-INDIAN CUISINE - TRAINING WORKSHOP AT THE TAJ VIVANTA WHITEFIELD BANGALORE



















Training Workshop on Colonial Anglo-Indian cuisine at the Taj Vivanta Whitefield, Bangalore
Railway Lamb Curry, Mint and Corriander Lamb Chops, Grandma's Country Captain Chicken, Colonial Pepper Chicken, Dak Bungalow Chicken Curry, Mullagatwany Soup, Bengal Lancers Shrimp Curry, Kedegeree, etc etc


Friday, December 18, 2015

ANGLO-INDIAN GINGER WINE - ALSO KNOWN AS OT (THE OTHER THING)

GINGER WINE
 Ginger Wine is also known as OT or the ‘OTHER THING’ – the temperance drink for teetotalers. In the olden days, temperance drinks were not only seen as delicious non- alcoholic tipple, but were also thought to have health benefits. Ginger wine was advocated as a good digestive and for soothing nausea but also good for sore throats and colds.
(Ginger Wine and other temperance drinks were actually served in special Temperance Bars in the early 20th century. These Temperance Bars advocated abstinence from alcohol, often asked their patrons to sign a no-booze pledge and renounce the demon drink!)

Ingredients
 200 grams fresh ginger
1 kg white sugar
6 limes or lemons (extract the juice)
3 pieces cinnamon
1dry red chillie (remove the seeds)
3 litres water

Peel and wash the ginger and cut into thin slices. Make lime juice and keep aside. In a large clean vessel put all the above ingredients together with the water and bring to boil. Boil for at least 2 hours first on high then on low heat till the decoction is slightly thick. Remove from heat and add the lime juice. When cold, strain through a thin cloth. Bottle the wine and use whenever required.





GINGER WINE also Known As OT -THE OTHER THING for Christmas

GINGER WINE (also known as OT ot The Other Thing - the non-temperance drink for Teetotalers) to wash down all the rich food over Christmas

200 grams fresh ginger,
1 kg sugar,
6limes (extract the juice),
3 pieces cinnamon,
1 Red chillie (remove the seeds),
 3 litres water

Peel and wash the ginger and cut into thin slices. Make limejuice and keep aside. In a large clean vessel put all the above ingredients together (ecxept the lime juice) with the water and bring to boil on high heat. Boil for at least 2 hours on low heat till the decoction is slightly thick. Remove from heat and add the limejuice. When cold, strain through a thin cloth, then bottle, and use whenever required. This is a good digestive.

Tuesday, December 15, 2015

ANGLO-INDIAN CHRISTMAS DINNER MENU
















SUGGESTIONS FOR AN ANGLO-INDIAN CHRISTMAS DINNER MENU
Here are a few suggested dishes for a typical Anglo-Indian Dinner Menu.  I’ve suggested 4 dishes each under ( a) Beef / Lamb / Mutton  (b) Chicken / Turkey / Duck  (c)  Pork  (d) Baked Dishes and Casseroles (e) Veggies and Accompaniments and (f) Desserts. You could mix and match and choose the dishes that you would like to have for your own special Anglo-Indian Christmas Dinner.  All the Dishes could be accompanied with Bread, Rice or any Indian Bread of your choice.  Simple and easy recipes for all these popular Anglo-Indian Dishes are featured on my website www.bridget-white-kumar.com (http://anglo-indianrecipes.blogspot.com)

a) BEEF / MUTTON / LAMB
1. BEEF ROAST WITH GRAVY
2. MUTTON / LAMB CRUMB CHOPS
3. BEEF / MUTTON / LAMB VINDALOO
4. BEEF PEPPER STEAKS
b) CHICKEN / TURKEY / DUCK
1. COUNTRY CAPTAIN CHICKEN
2. CHICKEN DUMPLING STEW
3. TRADITIONAL STUFFED TURKEY OR CHICKEN ROAST
4. NANA’S SPECIAL DUCK ROAST
c). PORK
1. ANGLO-INDIAN PORK VINDALOO
2. ANGLO-INDIAN PORK ROAST
3. PORK BUFFAD
4. PORK CHOPS
 d) BAKED DISHES AND CASSEROLES
1. STEAMED MEAT LOAF
2. SHEPHERD’S PIE
3. GRILLED whole FISH
4. CHICKEN CASSEROLE
e). VEGGIES AND ACCOMPANIMENTS
 1. GRILLED TOMATOES
2. BAKED VEGETABLE PLATTER
3. CAULIFLOWER OR BROCCOLI WITH BUTTER AND GARLIC SEASONING
4. MASH POTATOES
 f) DESSERTS
1. TIPSY TRIFLE PUDDING
2. BREAD AND BUTTER PUDDING
3. CARAMEL CUSTARD

 4.  POACHED PEARS AND APPLES IN RED WINE 

Sunday, December 13, 2015

DODOL OR DHOL DHOL (BLACK RICE HALWA) - an Anglo-Indian Christmas Sweet




DODOL OR DHOL DHOL (BLACK RICE HALWA)

Dodol or Black Rice Halwa is a delicious Christmas Sweet purported to be another legacy of the Portuguese to Anglo-Indian Cuisine. The Main ingredients in Dodol are) Black Rice (Burmese Puttu Rice) powder, Almonds or cashew nuts, Coconut Milk and lots of ghee or clarified butter. This Christmas Delicacy takes hours to prepare and requires many hands for stirring it. The men of the house are usually roped in to help stir the black bubbling mass till it turns into a delicious and mouth watering Halwa. The Dodol that is prepared in Anglo-Indian homes  is usually made with white sugar. However, the Dodol which is very popular in Goa uses jaggery or brown sugar instead.  Dodol is also very popular in other countries such as Srilanka, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines etc. Here is an old and easy recipe that my mum used for many years.
DODOL (A coconut and rice flour based halwa)
Makes 30 pieces      Preparation time 2 hours
Ingredients
1 kg Black Puttu Rice flour or Red Rice flour
1 kg sugar                                                     
300 grams almonds
200 grams cashew nuts
1 cups roasted fine semolina or soogi or semolina           
½ kg ghee
5 cups thick coconut milk
Boil the sugar and coconut milk together in a fairly big vessel till it forms thick syrup. Mix the rice flour and semolina together and add to the syrup a little at a time and mix well. Add the ghee, cashew nuts and almonds. Keep stirring continuously and cook on low heat  till the mixture is thick and leaves the sides of the pan. Remove from the heat and pour onto a greased plate. Cut into squares when cold. (The Dodol will be black
 
MICROWAVE RECIPE FOR DODOL / DHOL DHOL
The total time taken for microwaving is 8+8+8+4 minutes = 28 minutes

1 cup of black (Puttu) rice flour
   400 ml Coconut milk
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon almond essence
2 dessertspoons of butter
2 cups caster sugar
Mix together the flour, sugar, salt to the coconut milk in the microwave safe dish in which you intend to cook the dhol dhol. Mix well by hand till smooth and darkly glossy.
Microwave on medium for 8 minutes. Remove from microwave and stir well. Repeat.

The mixture will have begun thickening at the edges, mix in, and ensure that it is smooth.
Add the butter and mix in well, this will be a little difficult, but perservere.
Microwave on medium for 8 minutes. Remove and mix well.
Microwave on medium  for 4 minutes. Remove and mix well, it will be a jelly like mass. Beat smooth. Add almond essence and mix in quickly.
Spread halwa onto the greased tray, you will need to smoothen it out into an even layer.
Toss slivered almonds over the top and cut into squares. Don’t worry if the butter is oozing out of the dhol dhol, just tilt the plate a bit, and pour out the excess.
Store in a closed container on baking paper, or brown paper in the fridge.  Make it a week or so before Christmas.


Monday, November 16, 2015

BRIDGET WHITE-KUMAR FEATURED IN FOOD LOVERS MAGAZINE WINTER 2015
























Sharing a Feature on me on my efforts to preserve Anglo-Indian Cuisine in the latest issue of Food Lovers Magazine - Food Lovers - Winter 2015 (Vol 9 Issue 3). My sincere thanks to Kripal AmannaIndulekha Surendranath and the Team for giving me this wonderful opportunity. I enjoyed my session with you all. God bless 
The winter edition of Food Lovers Magazine is now in stores across India! With features that explore the culinary landscape of Progressive Indian Cuisine in Dubai, with some of best Indian chefs across the globe; a first-of-its-kind pairing of wine and robust, rustic Indian fare, representing the length and breadth of our diverse gastronomic tradition; a study of India’s Anglo Indian Cuisine to tell a story of forgotten colonial influences in the kitchen; and a fascinating culinary investigation of Gaggan, Bangkok, the first Indian restaurant to make it to the top 10 in the list of the World's Best Restaurants.
For all this and more, get your copy of Food Lovers Magazine today. To subscribe for a physical or digital copy, log on to www.foodlovers.in/subscribe







Thursday, October 22, 2015

HURRY-BURRY CHICKEN CURRY (Jaldhi Chicken Curry)























HURRY-BURRY CHICKEN CURRY (Jaldhi Chicken Curry) 
Just as the name implies, this delicious Chicken Curry can be made in a hurry. However, don’t be too much in haste to get it done as your ‘hurry-burry’ can spoil the Curry!

Serves 6     Time required: 30 Minutes
Ingredients

1 kg chicken jointed and cut into medium size pieces
2 tomatoes chopped finely
2 large onions chopped                              
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
2 or 3 teaspoons chillie powder
1 teaspoon cumin powder
1 teaspoon coriander powder
3 cloves
2 small pieces of cinamon
2 teaspoons ginger garlic paste                  
3 tablespoons oil         
Salt to taste    
2 tablespoons vinegar                                               
2 tablespoons chopped coriander leaves

Make a thick paste with the turmeric powder, chillie powder, cumin powder, coriander powder, ginger garlic paste, salt and vinegar. Apply this paste on the chicken and keep aside.

Meanwhile heat oil in a pan and add the onions, cinamon and cloves, Fry till golden brown. Now add the marinated chicken and chopped tomatoes, and fry for some time till the oil separates from the mixture. Add sufficient water and cook till the chicken is done and the gravy is thick. Garnish with chopped coriander leaves. Serve with rice or any Indian Bread. 

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

A COLLECTION OF SIMPLE ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPES






















#Newbooka collectionofsimpleanglo-indianrecipes

‘A COLLECTION OF SIMPLE ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPES’ is a revised, consolidated version of four of my earlier Cookery Books, namely Anglo-Indian Delicacies, A Collection of Anglo-Indian Roasts, Casseroles and Bakes, The Anglo-Indian Snack Box and The Anglo-Indian Festive Hamper.
 More than 350 Recipes of traditional, popular and well loved, Anglo-Indian Dishes have been specially selected from these earlier cook books and featured in this Omni-bus Edition. This single consolidated  Imprint of easy- to- follow Recipes of popular  Anglo-Indian Dishes  features Soups & Pepper Water, Curries & Fries, Roasts & Stews, Rice dishes & Pilafs, Foogath and Sambal, Pickles & Relishes, Casseroles and Baked Dishes, Short Eats, Nibbles & Finger food, Sweets & Desserts, Custards & Puddings, Christmas & Festive Treats,  Homemade wine, Curry Powders, etc.
 The huge selection of Recipes featured in this Cookery book will surely take one on a sentimental and nostalgic journey down  memory lane of old forgotten Anglo-Indian Delicacies. All the old dishes cooked during the time of the British Raj have now been revived to suit present day tastes and aplates. This Cookery Book would also serve as a ‘Ready Reckoner’ and a useful guide for teaming up dishes for everyday Anglo-Indian   Meals as well as for festive and special occasions.
 So what are you waiting for? Delve into this awesome collection and you’ll find simple and easy recipes for preparing your favorite Ox tail and Trotters Soups, Plain Pepper Water or Bone Pepper Water, Vindaloos and Curries, Devil Fries & Chops, Nana’s Special Duck, Chicken, Beef & Pork Roasts, Country Captain Chicken, Papa Pat’s Pork Chops, Mince Cutlets, Stews, Croquettes & Rissoles, Yellow Coconut Rice & Ball Curry, Junglee Palau & Vegetable Jalfrazie, Cabbage Foogath & Tomato Sambal, Brinjal Pickle, Fish Padda and many more ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES.
 Add that special ‘Anglo’ touch to your meal by baking a simple and tasty Shepherd’s Pie, a Pot Luck Casserole, a Pork Mince Pie or any of those old ‘one dish meals’  that your grandma baked in your childhood. Choose your favourite baked dish recipe from A COLLECTION OF ANGLO-INDIAN ROASTS, CASSEROLES AND BAKES. The very names of the recipes will make you drool. Round  it off with a creamy Caramel Custard, Bread Pudding, Strawberry Flummery, Apple Grunt or any other lip-smacking Anglo-Indian Dessert or Sweet from the vast selection that has been featured.
 Host a Party and serve your guests old Anglo-Indian Short Eats and Nibbles from
THE ANGLO-INDIAN SNACK BOX, that were the rage at ‘Parties, Soirees and Elegant Evening Gatherings’ in the olden days -  all innovated and made famous by the Mog Cooks of yore in the Tea Gardens in the Hills. Snack on Liver on Toast Squares, Scotch Eggs and Deviled Eggs, Cheese Straws, Mince Curry Puffs, Coconut Puffs, Mince Panthras, Fish Fingers, Fritters and a whole lot more,
 What’s your favourite childhood Christmas memory?  Do you associate Christmas with the smells, sounds and sights of the season?  This Cookery Book aims at just that. The separate section on THE ANGLO-INDIAN FESTIVE HAMPER features recipes of all the old Anglo-Indian Christmas favourites such as the Traditional Christmas Cakes, Plum Cakes, Mince Pies, Fruit Cakes, Kalkals, Rose Cookies, Coconut Sweets, the Christmas Pudding, Bole Cake, Semolina Cake, Dodol, Beveca, Marzipan Sweets, Peanut Fudge, Cashew nut Fudge, , etc, etc. It will awaken long forgotten magical memories of   childhood - Of  the smell of the decorated Pine Christmas Tree in the sitting room, the enticing aroma of Christmas Cakes being baked, the Kalkals and Rose Cookies being fried and the aroma of the other Christmas Goodies being prepared in the kitchen by Mama and Nana - Memories of the whole family sitting round the dining table on “Kalkal Making Day” rolling the kalkals on the back of a fork or fighting to lick the left over cake batter in the mixing bowl come flooding back.  Recreate the Christmas of your childhood with these recipes of all the old Christmas Treats. Then to round off the festive spread, you could make your own home-made Grape and Ginger Wine.
 The recipes in this book are simple and easy to follow and only easily available ingredients have been suggested. The easy-to-follow directions for preparing these old, popular, sumptuous dishes make cooking simple, enjoyable and problem-free. The pungency of the dishes can be adjusted according to individual taste by reducing or increasing the amount of chillie powder, spices or pepper powder suggested in each recipe. 
All the recipes in this Book are for 6 generous servings. If cooking for a smaller or larger number, the quantities should be adjusted accordingly.


The word “Everlasting” means ‘something, that once created, endures through time and never ceases to exist’. Anglo-Indian Cuisine is “EVERLASTING” and will endure forever and ever. 

Sunday, October 4, 2015

ANGLO-INDIAN BEEF SMORE STEW















ANGLO-INDIAN BEEF SMORE STEW
Beef Smore Stew is an old Colonial dish that was brought to India from Ceylon. It is actually a Ceylonese Dutch Dish which is still popular there. A whole Fillet of Beef Loin or stewing Beef is slowly simmered in a spiced Coconut gravy, then sliced like beef roast and served with the gravy along with either a bowl of rice or bread. The beef could be substituted with mutton or pork if desired.
 Serves 6   Time required: 1 hour 45 minutes
Ingredients:
1 kg chunk of good Beef Tender Loin or Stewing Beef
3 onions chopped finely
1 teaspoon chopped garlic
1 teaspoon chopped ginger
2 tomatoes chopped
2 carrots chopped into small pieces
1 cup peas
6 or 8 green beans broken into pieces
3 cloves
2 one inch pieces of cinnamon
1 teaspoon whole pepper corns
1 bay leaf
3 green chillies slit lengthwise
1 teaspoon chillie powder
1 teaspoon coriander powder
½ teaspoon cumin powder
¼ teaspoon turmeric powder
1 cup coconut milk (or 1 small tetra pack)
2 tablespoons vinegar
1 teaspoon lime / lemon juice
Salt to taste
3 tablespoons oil
 Wash the meat and prick it with a fork or skewer. Rub it well with the lime juice, turmeric powder and lime / lemon juice and leave it aside for about ½ an hour.
Heat the oil in a suitable pan and fry the chopped ginger, chopped garlic, cinnamon, cloves, bay leaf, pepper corns for a minute. Add the chunk of beef, and sear it on high heat turning it from side to side until brown.
Now add all the other ingredients and mix well. Fry for about 3 or 4 minutes till the tomatoes start to pucker. Add sufficient water and simmer on low heat (approximately one hour) till the meat is tender and the gravy sufficiently thick. Spoon all the gravy into a bowl.
Add a tablespoon of butter and gently fry the cooked meat till golden brown. Remove the meat on to a cutting or carving board and cut it into suitable slices. Transfer to a serving dish and pour the gravy on top.

Serve with either rice or bread. 

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

A COLLECTION OF SIMPLE ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPES



















‘A COLLECTION OF SIMPLE ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPES’ is a revised, consolidated version of four earlier Recipe Books of Bridget White, namely Bridget’s Anglo-Indian Delicacies, A Collection of   Anglo-Indian Roasts, Casseroles and Bakes, The Anglo-Indian Snack Box &The Anglo-Indian Festive Hamper.
 More than 350 Recipes of traditional, popular and well loved, Anglo-Indian Dishes have been specially selected from these earlier Cook Books and featured in this Omni-bus Edition. This single Consolidated Imprint of easy- to- follow Recipes features Soups, Pepper Water &  Vindaloo, Curries & Fries, Roasts & Stews, Chops and Cutlets, Croquettes & Rissoles, Foogaths and Vegetarian Delights, Rice Dishes & Pilafs, Pickles & Relishes, Casseroles and Baked Dishes, Snacks & Short Eats, Nibbles & Finger food, Sweets & Desserts, Custards & Puddings, Christmas Cakes & Festive Treats, Curry Powders, etc.The huge selection of Anglo-Indian dishes featured in this Cookery book will surely take one on a sentimental and nostalgic journey down  memory lane of old forgotten Anglo-Indian Culinary Delights. All the old dishes cooked during the time of the Raj have now revived to suit present day tastes and palates. This Cookery Book would also serve as a ‘Ready Reckoner’ and a useful guide for teaming up dishes for everyday Anglo-Indian Meals as well as for festive and special occasions. 

FOREWORD (A Collection of Simple Anglo-Indian Recipes) 
  It gives me great pleasure to bring out this new publication entitled ‘A COLLECTION OF SIMPLE ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPES’ which is a revised, consolidated version of 4 of my earlier Recipe Books, namely Bridget’s Anglo-Indian Delicacies, A Collection of Anglo-Indian Roasts, Casseroles and Bakes, The Anglo-Indian Snack Box and The Anglo-Indian Festive Hamper.
 More than 350 Recipes of traditional, popular and well loved, Anglo-Indian Dishes have been specially selected from these earlier Cookery Books and featured in this Omni-bus Edition. The huge selection of Anglo-Indian dishes featured in this Recipe Book will surely take one on a sentimental and nostalgic journey down  memory lane of old forgotten Anglo-Indian Culinary Delights. All the old dishes cooked during the time of the Raj have now been revived to suit present day tastes and palates. This Recipe Book would also serve as a ‘Ready Reckoner’ and a useful guide for teaming up dishes for everyday Anglo-Indian Meals as well as for festive and special occasions.
 So what are you waiting for? Delve into this awesome collection and you’ll find simple and easy recipes for preparing your favorite Ox tail and Trotters Soups, Plain Pepper Water or Bone Pepper Water, Vindaloos and Curries, Devil Fries & Chops, Nana’s Special Duck, Chicken, Beef & Pork Roasts, Beef and Chicken Country Captain, Papa Pat’s Pork Chops, Mince Cutlets, Stews, Croquettes & Rissoles, Yellow Coconut Rice & Ball Curry, Junglee Palau & Vegetable Jalfrazie, Devil Chutney, Brinjal Pickle, Fish Padda and many more ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES.
 Add that ‘Anglo’ touch to your meal by baking a simple and tasty Shepherd’s Pie, a Pot Luck Casserole, a Pork Mince Pie or any of the old ‘one dish meals’  that your grandma baked in your childhood. Choose the recipe for your favourite baked dish  from
A COLLECTION OF ANGLO-INDIAN ROASTS, CASSEROLES AND BAKES. The very names of the dishes will make you drool. Round  it off with a creamy Caramel Custard, Bread Pudding, Strawberry Flummery, Apple Grunt or any other lip-smacking Anglo-Indian Dessert or Sweet from the vast selection that has been featured.
 Have a Party and serve your guests delicious Snacks, Short Eats and Nibbles from THE ANGLO-INDIAN SNACK BOX, that were the rage at ‘Parties, Soirees and Elegant Evening Gatherings’ in the olden days -  all innovated and made famous by the Mogh  Cooks of yore in the Tea Gardens in the Hills. Snack on Liver on Toast Squares, Scotch Eggs and Deviled Eggs, Cheese Straws, Mince Curry Puffs, Coconut Puffs, Mince Panthras, Fish Fingers, Fritters and a whole lot more,
 What’s your favourite childhood Christmas memory?  Do you associate Christmas with the smells, sounds and sights of the season?  This Cookery Book aims at just that. The separate section on THE ANGLO-INDIAN FESTIVE HAMPER features recipes of all the old Anglo-Indian Christmas favourites such as the Traditional Christmas Cakes, Plum Cakes, Mince Pies, Fruit Cakes, Kalkals, Rose Cookies, Coconut Sweets, the Christmas Pudding, Bole Cake, Semolina Cake, Dodol, Beveca, Marzipan Sweets, Peanut Fudge, Cashew nut Fudge, , etc, etc. It will awaken long forgotten magical memories of childhood - Of  the smell of the decorated Pine Christmas Tree in the Sitting Room, the enticing aroma of Christmas Cakes being baked, the Kalkals and Rose Cookies being fried and the aroma of the other Christmas Goodies being prepared in the kitchen by Mama and Nana - Memories of the whole family sitting round the dining table on “Kalkal Making Day” rolling the kalkals on the back of a fork or fighting to lick the left over cake batter in the mixing bowl will come flooding back.  Recreate the Christmas of your childhood with these recipes of all the old Christmas Treats. Then to round off the festive spread, you could make your own home-made Grape and Ginger Wine.
 The recipes in this book are simple and easy to follow and only easily available ingredients have been suggested. The easy-to-follow directions for preparing these old, popular, sumptuous dishes make cooking simple, enjoyable and problem-free.
 All the recipes in this Book are for 6 generous servings. If cooking for a smaller or larger number, the quantities should be adjusted accordingly

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

ANGLO-INDIAN FOOD COOKING TRAINING WORKSHOP AT THE SJUAN RAJ MAHAL PALACE JAIPUR




I'm just back from Jaipur where I conducted a Cooking Training Workshop for 3 days from the  24TH TO 26TH August 2015 on Colonial Anglo-Indian Cuisine at the Sujan Rajmahal Palace for around 20 of the Chefs and Khansamas of the various Hotel properties of the Sujan Luxury Group such as Sher Bagh Ranthambhore (the tiger Camp), The Serai Jaisalmer (Desert Camp), Jawai the Leapord Camp, and the Rajmahal Palace Jaipur. Had an amazing and out of this world experience at the Rajmahal Palace and a fulfilling and wonderful teaching session sharing Classic Colonial Cuisine to a very receptive and eager to learn batch of learners. Many thanks to Mr. Yusuf Ansari for giving me this wonderful opportunity.

‪#‎angloindiancuisine‬‪#‎bridgetwhite‬‪#‎angloindianrecipes‬‪#‎Sujanluxury‬




Old Colonial Anglo-Indian Dishes that were recreated and demonstrated were The Dak Bungla / Bungalow Mest Curry, Grandma's Country Captain Chicken, Railway Mutton Curry, Lamb Chops, Pork Vindaloo, Chicken Vindaloo, Junglee Pilaf, Coconut Rice, Lamb Mince Ball Curry, Butter Parsley Rice with Nuts and Raisins, Mince Fricadels, Fish Rissoles, Egg Chops, Mince Curry Puffs, Lamb Mince Panthras, etc.

Thursday, August 20, 2015

COCONUT RICE, BALL CURRY (BAD WORD CURRY) AND DEVIL CHUTNEY - DECCAN HERALD 3RD MARCH 2015


















OUR SATURDAY SPECIAL ANGLO-INDIAN LUNCH – COCONUT RICE, BALL CURRY AND DEVIL CHUTNEY
 I was born and brought up in  Kolar Gold Fields, a small mining town in the erstwhile Mysore  State (Karnataka) in South India. Kolar Gold Fields or K.GF as everyone knows, had a large and predominant British and Anglo-Indian population and was known as THE LITTLE ENGLAND in the olden days. Our lives therefore were influenced to a great extent by British Colonial Culture.Our Food habits were typically Anglo-Indian - Breakfast was normally a bowl of Oats porridge, toast with either butter and jam and Eggs. (Sundays saw sausages, bacon or ham on the Breakfast table). Lunch was a typical Anglo-Indian meal which consisted of Steamed Rice, Beef Curry with vegetables, Pepper water or dhal curry, and a vegetable foogath or side dish. Dinner was always Bread or Dinner rolls with a meat Dry Dish, (It was an unwritten rule that we didn’t eat  rice at night). We normally had either beef or mutton every day, fish invariably on Wednesdays and Fridays and Pork or Chicken or Fowl on Sundays.
 My mum was en exceptional cook and even the most ordinary dishes cooked by her tasted delicious. She was very versatile and imaginative when it came to cooking. She would improvise and turn out the most delicious curries and side dishes with whatever ingredients were on hand. Every dish she prepared was delicious even if it was just the basic Rice and Meat Curry that was cooked every day. My mum had a procedure for everything. The onions had to be thinly sliced and the green chillies and coriander leaves chopped finely. Even the tomatoes for the curry were first scalded or blanched and the skin removed, then chopped into bits and strained through a strainer / sieve so that only the pulp was used and the seeds and skin thrown away!!!
 While our everyday lunch was considered simple, lunch on Saturdays and Sundays was special. Saturday lunch was invariably Yellow Coconut Rice, Mince Ball Curry (or Bad Word Curry as the word ‘Ball’ was considered a bad or slang word in those days), and Devil Chutney. My mind still recalls and relishes the taste of the Mince Ball Curry and Coconut Rice that my mum prepared on Saturdays for us. On Saturdays we had only half-day school so we were back home by 12.30 pm ravenously hungry and we’d be assailed by the delicious aroma of the Coconut Rice and the Tasty Mince Ball Curry even before we reached our gate.
 The mince for the Ball Curry, had to be just right, so the meat, (either beef or mutton), was brought home fresh from the Butcher Shop, cut into pieces, washed and then minced at home. (We had our own meat-mincing machine and Coconut Scraper which was fixed to the kitchen table like every Anglo-Indian family in those days. No making of the Mince at the Butchers as it had to be double ground in the Mincer only at home). The ground meat or mince, was then formed into even sized balls along with other chopped ingredients and dropped into the boiling Curry which was meanwhile cooking on the stove. The curry was then left to simmer till the mince balls were cooked and the gravy reached the right consistency.
 The Yellow Coconut Rice was always prepared with freshly squeezed coconut milk, Sometimes, two fresh coconuts would be broken and then scraped or grated. The scraped/grated coconut had to be soaked in hot water and the thick milk extracted. For every cup of rice double the quantity of coconut milk was the right proportion; a little more would make the rice ‘pish pash’ or over cooked, and a little less would mean that the rice wouldn’t be cooked well. So very accurate measurements were required. The raw rice and coconut milk would then be simmered with ghee or butter, saffron or turmeric, bay leaves and a few whole spices of cinnamon, cardamom and cloves till the rice was cooked perfectly. This delightful fragrant Rice preparation formed the perfect mild subtle base of our Saturday Special Anglo-Indian Meal. 
 The Yellow Coconut Rice and Mince Ball Curry (also known as Bad Word Curry) was always accompanied with a typical Anglo-Indian Sauce or Relish known as Devil Chutney.  Devil Chutney is a fiery red chutney or sauce. Its bright red colour often misleads people to think that it is a very pungent and spicy dish, while its actually a sweet and sour sauce, and only slightly pungent. The vinegar and sugar used in its preparation react with the onion and red chilli to produce the bright red colour. Devil Chutney is also known as “Hell fire or Hell’s flame chutney or Fiery Mother-in-law’s Tongue Chutney” due to its vivid colour.
 I would now like to share my mum’s recipes for these three special dishes. They are very easy to prepare.
 YELLOW COCONUT RICE   
Serves 6   Preparation Time 45 minutes
Ingredients
1 pack of coconut milk diluted with water to get 4 cups of milk or 1 fresh coconut grated and milk extracted to get 4 cups of diluted milk
2 cups of Raw Rice or Basmati Rice
½  teaspoon turmeric powder or a few strands of saffron
Salt to taste
4 tablespoons butter or ghee
3 cloves, 3 cardamoms, 3 small sticks of cinnamon and 2 bay leaves

Heat ghee in a large vessel or Rice cooker and fry the spices for a few minutes. Add the washed rice, salt, turmeric and 4 cups of coconut milk and cook till the rice is done.

Coconut Rice is best served with Ball Curry or Chicken curry and Devil Chutney.

ANGLO-INDIAN MINCE BALL CURRY (BAD WORD CURRY)
(Mince Koftas in a coconut based gravy)
Serves 6    Preparation time 45 minutes
Ingredients for the Curry
3 large onions chopped
6 or 7 curry leaves
3 teaspoons chilli powder
1 teaspoon coriander powder
3 teaspoons ginger garlic paste
3 big tomatoes pureed or chopped finely
½ cup ground coconut paste
1 teaspoon  all spice powder or garam masala
Salt to taste
3 tablespoons oil
1 teaspoon coriander leaves chopped finely for garnishing
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
 Ingredients for the Mince Balls (Koftas)
½ kg minced meat beef or mutton (fine mince)
½ teaspoon all spice powder or garam masala powder
3 green chilies chopped
A small bunch of coriander leaves chopped finely
Salt to taste
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
 Heat oil in a large pan and fry the onions till golden brown. Add the ginger garlic paste and the curry leaves and fry for some time. Now add the chili powder, coriander powder, all spice powder or garam masala powder, turmeric powder and coconut, and fry for a few minutes till the oil separates from the mixture. Now add the tomato puree and salt and simmer for some time. Add sufficient water and bring to boil.
 Meanwhile get the Mince Balls ready - Mix the all spice powder / garam masala powder, salt, chopped green chilies, turmeric powder and coriander leaves with the mince and form into small balls. When the curry is boiling, drop in the mince balls carefully one by one.
Simmer on slow heat for 20 minutes till the balls are cooked and the gravy is not too thick.
Serve hot with Coconut Rice and Devil Chutney.
 DEVIL CHUTNEY (HELL’S FLAME CHUTNEY)
Ingredients
2 medium size onions chopped roughly
1 teaspoon red chilli powder (use Kashmiri Chillie Powder)
1 tablespoon raisins (optional)
2 teaspoons sugar
A pinch of salt
2 tablespoons vinegar
 Grind all the above ingredients together till smooth. If chutney is too thick, add a little more vinegar.
 Serve with Coconut Rice and Mince Ball Curry